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OTHER TACKLE & FISHING MISCELLANY

Fishing Around Philadelphia
Originally published in Pennsylvania Heritage, Vol. XVI, No. 2, Spring, 1990, pp. 24-31

Philadelphia and the surrounding area offered excellent opportunities for fishing during the 18th and 19th centuries.

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Andrew B. Hendryx Uncaged
Originally published in The Reel News, Vol. XXVI, No. 3, May, 2016, pp. 22-25

Andrew B. Hendryx and his brother were heavily involved in the mining industry.

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Leonardo da Vinci's Reel Failure
Originally published in The Reel News, Vol. XXIV, No. 3, May, 2014, pp. 5-8

Leonardo, despite having foreseen the requisite mechanisms, failed to incorporate them in fishing reels.

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A Reel Old Murder Mystery
Originally published in The Reel News, Vol. XXIX, No. 4, July, 2019, pp. 8-10, 15

Reel inventor murdered! A cold case...

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Fishing Tackle From Eastern Pennsylvania: The Rods of George W. Burgess
A revised combination of two articles originally published in Fishing Collectibles Magazine, Vol. 8, No. 2, Fall, 1996, pp. 4-9, and in Fishing Collectibles Magazine, Vol. 8, No. 4, Spring, 1997, pp. 15-17

George W. Burgess manufactured canes, whips, umbrellas, and the like for a generation in Philadelphia before moving to Norristown, Pennsylvania, and going into business making fishing rods and other tackle. Beginning sometime around the Civil War, Burgess became one of the country's early rodmakers and experimented with various woods and methods of combining them. He almost certainly influenced, or was influenced by, Thaddeus Norris.

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Fishing Tackle From Eastern Pennsylvania: John Krider and the Sportsmen's Depot
A revision of an article originally published in Fishing Collectibles Magazine, Vol. 8, No. 3, Winter, 1997, pp.14-20

John Krider--gunsmith, hunter, ornithologist, taxidermist, fishing tackle maker--saw his small gunsmithing partnership in Philadelphia grow into one of the country's leading suppliers of hunting and fishing equipment. By the 1870s, he was manufacturing high-quality fishing rods of split bamboo, which he sold from his world-famous Sportsmen's Depot.

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All articles copyright© by Steven K. Vernon. All rights reserved. Redistribution or republication of text and/or illustrations in any form without permission is prohibited.